Journals

The AWSELVA Journal presents high quality and topical information from leading experts in the field of animal welfare science, ethics and law.

Chairman's Column

AWSELVA invites peer commentaries on the draft paper. Commentaries should be no longer than 1000 words, in UK English, referenced as appropriate and sent to james.yeates@rspca.org.uk with the subject entitled "AWSELVA Journal [and the title of the paper]"    

Chairman's Column

AWSELVA invites peer commentaries on the draft paper. Commentaries should be no longer than 1000 words, in UK English, referenced as appropriate and sent to james.yeates@rspca.org.uk with the subject entitled "AWSELVA Journal [and the title of the paper]"  
AWSELVA Journal Summer 2014 front cover

Chairman's Column

This journal – and this Association – focuses on three topics. Indeed, this issue contains good examples of all three – animal welfare, ethics and law – in some cases in the same papers. This multi- and inter-disciplinarity is why the newly developed author instructions still allow authors flexibility to choose the style that best seems to fit the discipline. It’s also why the journal is moving to have sub-editors for each discipline. But what...

Chairman's Column

One hardly needs to explain the significance of Ruth Harrison and her seminal book Animal Machines to an animal welfare oriented audience. Ruth Harrison’s book marked a change in the language surrounding animals. She argued that the animal cruelty vocabulary could not articulate the ways in which animals suffered in intensive production systems and as a consequence “Animal Welfare” entered the vocabulary. She also provided a...

Chairman's Column

Responsibility for animals used by man rests with us both morally and legally, including for animals we “watch”. This association chose to discuss at its most recent symposium the topic of Animals in Entertainment. One of the papers considered the subject of ethical tourism. When I was in New Zealand earlier this year I engaged in watching sperm whales, dusky dolphins, fur seals, yellow eyed and blue penguins and Southern albatross, and I...

Chairman's Column

A lot has happened since the last AWSELVA Journal issue. Most notably, we have seen the formation of the European specialisation centre for animal welfare science, ethics and law as part of the European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine. AWSELVA members were central to this success, not least Dr Mullan, Professor Morton and Dr Main, just as AWSELVA was vital in setting up the RCVS Certificate and Diploma. The college provides a...

Chairman's Column

Once again the Association hosted a well attended meeting on the effects of the current economic position on animal welfare. This meeting, held at the Wellcome Foundation meeting rooms in London, brought together speakers on a wide range of topics and finished with a workshop session which was actively and thoughtfully presented as a feedback report at the end of the day. We were also pleased to have the Presidents of the Royal College of...

Chairman's Column

The Bristol meeting in May, which included a well attended AGM, was an excellently conceived and organised scientific meeting with an added bonus package. Combining our meeting with the Bristol Festival of Ideas was a master stroke by the meeting conveners which enabled us to benefit from the opportunity to hear from Peter Singer 35 years on from the publication of his book ‘Animal Liberation’. There is detailed comment elsewhere in this edition...

Chairman's Column

As I look forward to our spring meeting in Bristol and the Peter Singer Lecture to follow, both with their reflective flavour, it is clear to see that animal welfare and associated ethical considerations have advanced almost beyond recognition over the past 50 years or so, yet equally we have not lost sight of former philosophical positions. As an example of how current scientific techniques force us to challenge our beliefs and evaluate...

Chairman's Column

With this column coming hot on the heels of our recent meeting in London (of which you can read elsewhere in the edition) it allows some reflection of the importance of the policy debate. This is timely given the recent publication of FAWC’s report 'Farm Animal Welfare in Great Britain: Past Present and Future’. Importantly reflecting on the ethical basis for the humane treatment of farm animals, the report also brings together many contemporary...

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